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The Fourth Wave Coffee Movement

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Photo: Matt Sampson, Omakase, Discourse Coffee, Sister Bay, WI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Who can take a sunrise (who can take a sunrise)
Sprinkle it with dew (sprinkle it with dew)
Cover it with choc’late and a miracle or two
The Fourth Wave Coffee Man (the Coffee Man”

Discourse: A Liquid Workshop in Sister Bay, WI, approaches fourth wave coffee by elevating the quality and experience of an espresso drink to an art form. Their mad scientist-artist baristas use unique ingredients like reconstituted strawberry, black grape gel, olive oil snow, and different types of fogs and essences captured in nature. Depending on the menu, customers could find themselves sipping a latte based on the memory of a childhood trip to the beach, or an espresso shot based on a missed punch in a dark nightclub.

Like many people, you could be asking yourself, how did we get here? The state of coffee consumption, like other cultural and sociological forces, can best be described in a series of waves beginning in the 19th century.

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S U R F ‘ S  U P

The first wave of coffee describes the time between 1900 and 1960 when brands like Folgers and Maxwell House were innovating the business for convenience and mass production. These brands made coffee widely available and because of them, it’s popularity really took off. Consumers were now able to open a tin and enjoy a pleasantly bitter cup with very little hassle and at a very low cost.

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C A R V E

The second wave of coffee describes the reaction consumers had towards decades of this mass-produced coffee. In the 1970s, coffee drinkers started experimenting with “specialty roasts”. Coffee was starting to be marketed as more of an experience than just a grocery product. Starbucks launched, Peet’s coffee launched, and second wave coffee took hold as customers started frequenting coffee shops.

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C R E S T

Like the second-wave backlash to the mass-produced coffee of the first, the third wave was a reaction to 30 years of corporate coffee chains opening on every street corner. In 2002, the focus switched from producing and marketing coffee to the coffee itself. Independently owned cafes began studying things like soil, growing altitude, and processing techniques. Cafe owners, baristas, and roasters starting looking into every aspect of the process in order to craft the best single cup of coffee possible.

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T H E  W A V E  O F  T H E  F U T U R E

Today a century of innovation, experimentation, and meeting consumer demand has led coffee to the top of its game. We are now in coffee’s fourth wave, which is a wave that is still defining itself.

It is said that fourth wave coffee is the best of all waves combined. Today, not only is the quality of the coffee incredibly important but so becomes the experience of drinking it. The fourth wave encourages a new way of looking at coffee and an experimental attitude.

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H A N G   L O O S E

The possibilities of what fourth wave coffee can be are only limited to the borders of the barista’s imagination and the ingredients they can conjure up. Fourth wave coffee is not only meant to be experienced through taste but also felt through the lens of one’s own heart.

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“Who can take espresso (who can take espresso)
Wrap it in a sigh (wrap it in a sigh)
Soak it in the sun and make a groovy lemon pie
The Fourth Wave Coffee Man (the Coffee Man)” 

– Adapted from “The Candy Man” written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley.

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Facial Plastic Surgery Illustration

Hi!!

It’s been …too long. I won’t bore you with the details surrounding my absence, but I will tell you that while I was gone, I got to do this:

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Treatment Areas for Facial Fillers and Botox, oh my! This illustration was created for a facial plastic surgeon client to go inside an E-Newsletter. It is pure visual content!

I used a few photo references to get the facial proportions right, and my best judgement on the eyebrows.

Fact: I plucked half of my eyebrows off in the 90s

Go forth and be well! 

 

Temporary Tatts

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A little while ago I created a “How to Set up your Illustration Portfolio” post where I recommended that you find examples of professional projects similar to the projects you would like to get and to illustrate your own version of them in order to show future clients that you are ready for top-level work… Well, here I am! Back to set a good example by doing one or maybe more of these “professional” projects! Let’s try it!

When I was searching for new projects that seemed like they could be real projects, I somehow stumbled across BriefBox and my search was over!

I did not sign up for the service. However, I did borrow one of the many free fake creative briefs they have on thier website for designers and illustrators like myself who want to get practice doing professional work, improve thier portfolios or practice thier skills.

Here is what the brief said:

Project overview:

‘Tatties’ specialize in temporary tattoos. They are looking for a new food-based design or set of designs to add to the ‘Food’ category on their online shop. Their transfer tattoos appeal to a wide audience of people, from young children who want to have fun with temporary tattoos to middle-aged women using them for parties and others events.

Use the inspiration images to get a feel for the style of designs that have been successful in the past, and then begin playing with your ideas. Using food as the theme, come up with two or three quirky designs that would work well as temporary tattoos: Use quotations, realistic pictures of food, or perhaps more cartoon-like images.

The nature of temporary tattoos is fun and playful, and the client is looking for something that reflects this; think bold colours and shaping. Try to work some humour in there!

 And here is what I did:

Food Tatts

5/5 Would draw again!!

Click here to try out Briefbox

Have you used Briefbox? Where else can you find fake creative briefs? What do you use to curate your portfolio? Let me know in the comments!

Follow me on IG & Twitter for future updates to this blog.

Happy Drawing Everyone!

TYFreading

How to Draw a Rose

Learn how to draw a rose in five easy steps

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Hello!

Today i’m going to show you how to draw a rose. Seems easy right? Well, it is! (the hardest part is the leaves, and that just takes a little practice.)

You will need a pencil, an eraser and a piece of paper.

Let’s get started!

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Draw a slightly wavy line that grows a bit thinner towards the top.

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Petiole – The tiny stem holding all the leaflets.

Petiolul – a subdivision of the petiole that connects a leaflet to the petiole.

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Rose leaves are ovate. This means they look sort of like large, round eyes.

Here are some pictures of rose leaves that might be helpful to use as a reference.

Now we will start drawing the bud of our rose.

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Make a “U” shape at the top of your stem to create the lower portion of the rose bud.

Erase any over lapping lines on the leaflets.

Last Step!

A long time ago, I taught myself this trick for drawing the inside of a rose:

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Draw a spiral at the end of your “U” shape to create the look of swirling petals.

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Now you’re done! Look at your lovely rose!

 

For more information about roses:

Visit the American Rose Society or read this Wikipedia article on roses.

 

Click here to learn how to draw a cat.

Click here to learn how to draw a sea turtle.

 

Follow me on Twitter or Instagram for exclusive content and future updates to this blog.

 

TYFreading

 

 

 

Unicorn Stamp Illustration

The Project

A friend of mine who operates her own boutique clothing business created a new way to track special purchases made by her customers by stamping the back of tags and rewarding customers who collect the tags with free merch! Clever!

The Scope

One garment tag stamp illustration featuring a magical, girly unicorn with the text “You Found One!”. I estimated the project would take about 2 hours.

The Options

I created these four options for her to choose from. She decided the cursive version without a border was more fun. She also had me remove her initials. The revisions went very quickly.

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Presenting… The Final Image
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Unicorn Stamp Illustration

What a fun project!

Sea Foam Magazine Feature

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Oh my blog! My animations, music and insights are now featured on Sea Foam Magazine!

Even though I have decided to leave my music career behind me to focus on illustration and other slightly more legitimate ventures (there’s only so much time!), it still feels good to share what I’ve put my energy into with the world.

Oh, and there is free music!

Download a free track from my album “The Bridge” and read about my music and animations in this article by !

 

How To Set Up Your Illustration Portfolio

15 Essential Steps to Assembling the Perfect Illustration Portfolio

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Establishing Yourself Online and What to Include

Step 1: Hello World

Create a blog or website on WordPress or other web hosting site.

 

Use your own name for your blog or brand domain name if it is available.

Step 2: Become Legit

Purchase your domain name! Now you are legit DOT COM.

Step 3: Creating Your Website: Visual Branding Choices

  • Create a logo
  • Develop the overall visual branding of your site
  • Use easy to read typefaces and simple color choices that visually complement your illustration style.
  • Consider drawing a self-portrait for your internet avatars and your “About Me” section.
  • Consider user experience and basic web design best practices during this part. Your site should be mobile-friendly and your contact information should be easily available.

Step 4: Hook it up (Optional but recommended)

Create new accounts on various social media platforms for just your illustration. I recommend starting with Instagram and Pinterest. Once you have the accounts established, connect them to your site.

Consider researching how to use email marketing to attract leads to new projects. 

Step 5: Assemble and Publish Your Portfolio

Choose your best work and publish it to your site. You can create separate posts or pages for each project, depending on how in-depth you need to go.

Potential clients and art directors will most likely view your work online. However, If you are seeing a client in person, bring a physical copy of your portfolio with you.

What to include in your portfolio

Be consistent. Art directors stake their reputations on the ability of the artist to deliver great work. In order to set their mind at ease, your portfolio needs to prove your ability to do consistently great work.

Show only one style at a time. Using many different styles in your portfolio will create questions. Art directors and clients want to know what to expect from you. If you use a lot of different styles and modes of expression, pick the one that you think suits the project at hand the best.

Show consistency within characters. Draw characters from multiple angles, with varied expressions, engaged in a variety of activities and in different locations.

If you are a children’s book illustrator, draw children!

When drawing characters, do not have them looking directly at the viewer. This is breaking the “fourth wall” – akin to your favorite TV actor looking directly at the camera.

Show a variety of ages, races, and genders.

Show animals, but only if they are part of an illustration project. No stand-alone fine art pieces.

Remove any image from your portfolio that is not an illustration.

Draw different objects. Draw lamps, cars, furniture, cell phones, etc

Show that you can express different moods for different times of the day. A fall evening, a winter morning, a summer night, sunny days, overcast days, etc.

Show interior drawings (living rooms, kitchens, offices)

Show exterior drawings (grass, forests, mountains, fields, cities).

Show that you can illustrate different time periods (the 1950s, 15th century, etc.) Make sure the dress, architecture, and technology are appropriate for the time.

The images in your portfolio should look like professional assignments. To accomplish this, do a self-driven project where you provide your own illustrations for stories or articles that have already been illustrated by someone else. Traditional tales or nursery rhymes can be an easy starting point for experimentation.

10 strong images are way better than 10 strong images and 10 not-so-strong images. Only show your best work. You don’t want to be remembered for your weakest piece.

Provide black and white as well as color illustrations. If it’s not there, an art director will assume you can’t do it. If you can work using black and white as well as color, show it!

Those are the essentials steps to assembling the perfect portfolio!

Art directors, illustrators, dear readers, if I left anything out please let me know in the comments!

For new illustrators, I highly recommend subscribing to children’s book author Will Terry’s YouTube Channel. His videos are incredibly helpful and a lot of this information was mined from his video for “How To Set Up Your Illustration Portfolio”!

FOR MORE IN-DEPTH INFO ON WHAT TO PUT IN YOUR PORTFOLIO, CHECK OUT THESE OTHER HELPFUL ARTICLES AND SOURCES:

http://businessofillustration.com/

Hey Art Directors—What Do You Think About Illustrators?

The Illustrator’s Portfolio

For updates to this blog please subscribe at Catazoa.com or follow me on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook!

TYFreading