Temporary Tatts

hello

A little while ago I created a “How to Set up your Illustration Portfolio” post where I recommended that you find examples of professional projects similar to the projects you would like to get and to illustrate your own version of them in order to show future clients that you are ready for top-level work… Well, here I am! Back to set a good example by doing one or maybe more of these “professional” projects! Let’s try it!

When I was searching for new projects that seemed like they could be real projects, I somehow stumbled across BriefBox and my search was over!

I did not sign up for the service. However, I did borrow one of the many free fake creative briefs they have on thier website for designers and illustrators like myself who want to get practice doing professional work, improve thier portfolios or practice thier skills.

Here is what the brief said:

Project overview:

‘Tatties’ specialize in temporary tattoos. They are looking for a new food-based design or set of designs to add to the ‘Food’ category on their online shop. Their transfer tattoos appeal to a wide audience of people, from young children who want to have fun with temporary tattoos to middle-aged women using them for parties and others events.

Use the inspiration images to get a feel for the style of designs that have been successful in the past, and then begin playing with your ideas. Using food as the theme, come up with two or three quirky designs that would work well as temporary tattoos: Use quotations, realistic pictures of food, or perhaps more cartoon-like images.

The nature of temporary tattoos is fun and playful, and the client is looking for something that reflects this; think bold colours and shaping. Try to work some humour in there!

 And here is what I did:

Food Tatts

5/5 Would draw again!!

Click here to try out Briefbox

Have you used Briefbox? Where else can you find fake creative briefs? What do you use to curate your portfolio? Let me know in the comments!

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Happy Drawing Everyone!

TYFreading

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How to Draw a Rose

Learn how to draw a rose in five easy steps

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Hello!

Today i’m going to show you how to draw a rose. Seems easy right? Well, it is! (the hardest part is the leaves, and that just takes a little practice.)

You will need a pencil, an eraser and a piece of paper.

Let’s get started!

Rose1 copy

Draw a slightly wavy line that grows a bit thinner towards the top.

Rose2 copy

Petiole – The tiny stem holding all the leaflets.

Petiolul – a subdivision of the petiole that connects a leaflet to the petiole.

Rose3 copy

Rose leaves are ovate. This means they look sort of like large, round eyes.

Here are some pictures of rose leaves that might be helpful to use as a reference.

Now we will start drawing the bud of our rose.

Rose5 copy

Make a “U” shape at the top of your stem to create the lower portion of the rose bud.

Erase any over lapping lines on the leaflets.

Last Step!

A long time ago, I taught myself this trick for drawing the inside of a rose:

Rose6 copy.jpg

Draw a spiral at the end of your “U” shape to create the look of swirling petals.

Rose7 copy.jpg

Now you’re done! Look at your lovely rose!

 

For more information about roses:

Visit the American Rose Society or read this Wikipedia article on roses.

 

Click here to learn how to draw a cat.

Click here to learn how to draw a sea turtle.

 

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TYFreading

 

 

 

Unicorn Stamp Illustration

The Project

A friend of mine who operates her own boutique clothing business created a new way to track special purchases made by her customers by stamping the back of tags and rewarding customers who collect the tags with free merch! Clever!

The Scope

One garment tag stamp illustration featuring a magical, girly unicorn with the text “You Found One!”. I estimated the project would take about 2 hours.

The Options

I created these four options for her to choose from. She decided the cursive version without a border was more fun. She also had me remove her initials. The revisions went very quickly.

Screen Shot 2016-06-23 at 7.19.37 PM

Presenting… The Final Image
Unicorn Stampfinal2
Unicorn Stamp Illustration

What a fun project!

How To Set Up Your Illustration Portfolio

15 Essential Steps to Assembling the Perfect Illustration Portfolio

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Establishing Yourself Online and What to Include

Step 1: Hello World

Create a blog or website on WordPress or other web hosting site.

 

Use your own name for your blog or brand domain name if it is available.

Step 2: Become Legit

Purchase your domain name! Now you are legit DOT COM.

Step 3: Creating Your Website: Visual Branding Choices

  • Create a logo
  • Develop the overall visual branding of your site
  • Use easy to read typefaces and simple color choices that visually complement your illustration style.
  • Consider drawing a self-portrait for your internet avatars and your “About Me” section.
  • Consider user experience and basic web design best practices during this part. Your site should be mobile-friendly and your contact information should be easily available.

Step 4: Hook it up (Optional but recommended)

Create new accounts on various social media platforms for just your illustration. I recommend starting with Instagram and Pinterest. Once you have the accounts established, connect them to your site.

Consider researching how to use email marketing to attract leads to new projects. 

Step 5: Assemble and Publish Your Portfolio

Choose your best work and publish it to your site. You can create separate posts or pages for each project, depending on how in-depth you need to go.

Potential clients and art directors will most likely view your work online. However, If you are seeing a client in person, bring a physical copy of your portfolio with you.

What to include in your portfolio

Be consistent. Art directors stake their reputations on the ability of the artist to deliver great work. In order to set their mind at ease, your portfolio needs to prove your ability to do consistently great work.

Show only one style at a time. Using many different styles in your portfolio will create questions. Art directors and clients want to know what to expect from you. If you use a lot of different styles and modes of expression, pick the one that you think suits the project at hand the best.

Show consistency within characters. Draw characters from multiple angles, with varied expressions, engaged in a variety of activities and in different locations.

If you are a children’s book illustrator, draw children!

When drawing characters, do not have them looking directly at the viewer. This is breaking the “fourth wall” – akin to your favorite TV actor looking directly at the camera.

Show a variety of ages, races, and genders.

Show animals, but only if they are part of an illustration project. No stand-alone fine art pieces.

Remove any image from your portfolio that is not an illustration.

Draw different objects. Draw lamps, cars, furniture, cell phones, etc

Show that you can express different moods for different times of the day. A fall evening, a winter morning, a summer night, sunny days, overcast days, etc.

Show interior drawings (living rooms, kitchens, offices)

Show exterior drawings (grass, forests, mountains, fields, cities).

Show that you can illustrate different time periods (the 1950s, 15th century, etc.) Make sure the dress, architecture, and technology are appropriate for the time.

The images in your portfolio should look like professional assignments. To accomplish this, do a self-driven project where you provide your own illustrations for stories or articles that have already been illustrated by someone else. Traditional tales or nursery rhymes can be an easy starting point for experimentation.

10 strong images are way better than 10 strong images and 10 not-so-strong images. Only show your best work. You don’t want to be remembered for your weakest piece.

Provide black and white as well as color illustrations. If it’s not there, an art director will assume you can’t do it. If you can work using black and white as well as color, show it!

Those are the essentials steps to assembling the perfect portfolio!

Art directors, illustrators, dear readers, if I left anything out please let me know in the comments!

For new illustrators, I highly recommend subscribing to children’s book author Will Terry’s YouTube Channel. His videos are incredibly helpful and a lot of this information was mined from his video for “How To Set Up Your Illustration Portfolio”!

FOR MORE IN-DEPTH INFO ON WHAT TO PUT IN YOUR PORTFOLIO, CHECK OUT THESE OTHER HELPFUL ARTICLES AND SOURCES:

http://businessofillustration.com/

Hey Art Directors—What Do You Think About Illustrators?

The Illustrator’s Portfolio

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TYFreading